Diva Musing: It’s a Southern Thing:

Something a Southern Mom Might Say…

Southern mamas don’t mess around when it comes to manners. From birth, our mothers have been telling us how to act with some of the most colorful phrases ever uttered.

Who has been told that we weren’t raised in a barn? Or not to look a gift horse in the mouth?

The answer is every single one of us. And not just by our own mothers. Mamas we’ve never met before have used these mom-isms on us. Because there ain’t no off-switch on being a mama.

When it comes to the South, manners are taught from birth.

That’s why there are so many Southern phrases about being polite and minding your manners, most of which we can still hear our mamas saying in that tone of all-knowing authority. After all, were you even raised in the South if your mama didn’t yell “were you raised in a barn?” at least once every weekend?

With that in mind, we thought we’d take a look at some of the phrases Southern mamas live by when it comes to manners.

Don’t count your chickens before they hatch.

Meaning: Don’t assume something is going to happen before it does.

An empty wagon makes a lot of noise.

Meaning: people who don’t know what they’re talking abut tend to say the most.

Mind your P’sand Q’s

Meaning be on our best behavior

Buzzards and chickens come home to roost.

Meaning: What you do and say will catch up to you.

Don’t count your chickens before they hatch.

Meaning: Don’t assume something’s going to happen before it does.

You’ll catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

Meaning: You get better results when you are polite.

Don’t get too big for your britches.

Meaning: Don’t be conceited.

Pretty is as pretty does.

Meaning: How you treat people is more important than how you look

Never look a gift horse in the mouth.

Meaning: Don t’ question the value of a gift.

Hold your Horses.

Meaning: Be Patient.

Were you raised in a barn?

Meaning: Close the door behind you.

Don’t let our mouth overload your tail.

Meaning: Don’t say anything you can’t back up.

Be like the old lady who fell out of the wagon.

Meaning: Mind your own business.

Don’t sit there like a bump on a log

Meaning: Don just sit there not doing anything.

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